U.S. Alternative Fueling Stations by Fuel Type

1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Electric* 188 194 310 486 490 558 693 873 830 671 588 465 442 430 465 541 3394 13392 19410 25602 30945 42029 50627 61067 78301
Propane 3297 3297 3299 3299 4252 4255 5318 4153 3268 3403 3431 3966 3689 2995 2619 2371 2175 2468 2647 2597 2654 2956 2931 3594 3665 3514 3341 3178
Methanol (M85) 43 50 82 88 95 106 91 51 3
LNG 72 71 66 46 44 44 36 62 58 40 37 35 38 36 39 45 59 81 103 111 140 131 137 119
Hydrogen 7 7 9 14 17 32 46 63 58 56 58 53 51 39 54 64 60 61
Biodiesel** 2 16 79 142 176 304 459 742 645 679 644 627 675 757 783 721 697 702 681 613
CNG 349 497 1042 1065 1419 1426 1268 1267 1217 1232 1166 1035 917 787 732 721 778 772 841 910 1107 1263 1495 1563 1722 1693 1659 1591
E85 2 7 32 37 68 71 40 49 113 154 149 188 200 436 762 1208 1644 1928 2142 2442 2553 2639 2840 2990 3091 3322 3617 3777
Source: Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC), either directly (afdc.energy.gov/stations/states) or from historical Transportation Energy Data Books (www.osti.gov)
Notes: Starting in 2011, electric charging equipment was counted by the outlet rather than by the geographical location (i.e., station). This is different than other fuels, which only count the geographical location regardless of how many dispensers or nozzles are on site.
This chart shows the trend of U.S. alternative fueling stations by fuel type from 1992 to 2018. Propane stations were the most numerous until 2011, when they were surpassed by electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE), or charging units. The growth in EVSE units accelerated starting in 2011, following the 2010 increase of plug-in electric vehicles offered by major automakers. 2016 experienced the largest growth for EVSE to support the growing electric vehicle population, followed closely by 2017 and 2018. The number of EVSE units is expected to increase as the population of electric vehicles continues to grow. The number of E85 stations has been increasing steadily since 2004, as the number of flex-fuel vehicles available from major manufacturers has increased. The number of CNG stations decreased between 1996 and 2006 (despite the increase in CNG sales during this time) largely because the average station size was increasing.

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