Alternative Fuel and Fuel-Efficient Vehicle Acquisition and Use Requirements

The Tennessee Department of General Services must ensure that at least 25% of newly purchased passenger motor vehicles procured for use in areas designated as ozone nonattainment areas are all-electric vehicles (EVs), hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), natural gas vehicles (NGVs), or propane powered vehicles, provided that such vehicles are available at the time of procurement. If these vehicles are not available, conventional gasoline vehicles achieving an average fuel economy of at least 25 miles per gallon (mpg) may satisfy the requirement. In areas not designated as ozone nonattainment areas, at least 25% of newly purchased passenger motor vehicles must be EVs, HEVs, NGVs, propane powered vehicles, or conventional gasoline vehicles achieving an average fuel economy of at least 25 mpg. For non-passenger vehicles, state fleets must make a reasonable effort to purchase at least 5% of these vehicles as natural gas or propane vehicles.

State fleets must make every effort to ensure that 100% of newly purchased motor vehicles are energy-efficient vehicles. Energy-efficient vehicles are defined as passenger vehicles that are alternative fuel vehicles using alternative fuels, as defined by the Energy Policy Act of 1992; HEVs; conventional gasoline vehicles achieving an average fuel economy of at least 25 mpg; or vehicles powered by ultra-low sulfur diesel achieving an average fuel economy of at least 30 mpg. Additionally, state agencies should strive to use ethanol and biodiesel in appropriate state-owned vehicles whenever possible and should support the development of biofuels fueling infrastructure.

The Tennessee Department of General Services must inventory the state's passenger vehicle fleet and prepare annual progress reports that outline cost savings, pollution avoidance, and petroleum displacement of the fleet.

(Reference Tennessee Code 4-3-1109, and Executive Order 33, 2006)